5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless

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5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless
5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless

2. Pain in the pelvis

If you experience extreme pain in your pelvis – especially during sex or a visit to the toilet – there is a possibility of having endometriosis. This means that you have “lost” pieces of uterine lining that settle in places where they don’t belong, such as the ovaries or the bladder. This causes sharp pains or stings, especially during menstruation. In the long term, the probability of infertility can increase, which makes it more difficult to conceive. Luckily, however, most women who suffer from endometriosis have successful and healthy pregnancies regardless.

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3. Hot flashes

Do you ever suffer from hot flashes? Then it is possible that you are in the transition early. Although most women only face the transition around the age of fifty, for some people this happens earlier. Often this is hereditary, so if your mother went through the transition earlier than average, there is a possibility that this will happen with you too. It is essential to consult a doctor as soon as possible.

5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless
5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless

4. Hair in strange places one of 5 infertility symptoms that seem very harmless

Do you suddenly get hair on your lip, chin, neck or stomach? Then you may have a hormonal disorder. This can make it difficult to get pregnant. Sometimes contraception is necessary in such cases to balance the hormones.

5. Milky discharge from your nipples

Excess of prolactin in your body may lead to milky discharge from your breasts. This hormone tells your body that breast milk must be made. This symptom may indicate a false pregnancy, but also infertility.

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Infertility is the inability of a person, animal or plant to reproduce by natural means. It is usually not the natural state of a healthy adult, except notably among certain eusocial species (mostly haplodiploid insects).

In humans, infertility is the inability to become pregnant after one year of intercourse without contraception involving a male and female partner. There are many causes of infertility, including some that medical intervention can treat. Estimates from 1997 suggest that worldwide about five percent of all heterosexual couples have an unresolved problem with infertility. Many more couples, however, experience involuntary childlessness for at least one year: estimates range from 12% to 28%. Male infertility is responsible for 20–30% of infertility cases, while 20–35% are due to female infertility, and 25–40% are due to combined problems in both parts. In 10–20% of cases, no cause is found.

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